500th Anniversary Commemoration of the Protestant Reformation

500th Anniversary Commemoration of the Protestant Reformation

Five hundred years ago, Martin Luther, a Roman Catholic priest, nailed 95 theses on the front door of the Church in Wittenberg Germany, publicly marking the beginning of many protests against the Church of Rome. The separation spurned a period of spiritual renewal, spawning new gatherings, renewal and regeneration. Some people followed the teachings of Martin Luther, while others gravitated towards John Calvin, Huldrych Zwingli, Jan Hus, John Knox, Peter Waldo, and John Wycliffe. We lament the splintering of the Christian Church and marvel at the Holy Spirit’s fruitful response of spreading the gospel through Lutherans, Presbyterians, Reformers, Baptists, Wesleyans, Anglicans and Roman 

Catholics. In this Sunday evening’s service we are gathering together to celebrate some 70 years of influence in Canada’s 150 years of existence, further establishing God’s kingdom here on earth. As well as building churches, Reformers built Christian elementary schools and high schools, Christian colleges and universities. They started agencies that sought to breath a Christian perspective into farming and business, in politics and media, medicine and morality, in serving the homeless as well as the elderly. A number of CRC churches of Classis Niagara are celebrating this 500th anniversary with members of the Lutheran church, the Reformed Church of America and the Presbyterian Church in St. Catharines tonight. We thought we’d invite Classis Niagara to read through the Contemporary Testimony ~ Our World Belongs to God, as our litany, and lift up our hearts in praise and worship to the Lord. We invited some 15 to 17 ministries and agencies to give voice to the paragraphs into which they breathe life through their work in Niagara, across Ontario, and through this nation of Canada. On this evening, we want to celebrate the Lordship of Jesus Christ at work in and through us, giving God the Glory in all that we say and do.

Peter Van Geest